Family Office IP Camera Mini Infrared EMC Test

ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is a characteristic of electrical and electronic equipment that permits it to operate as intended in the presence of other electrical and electronic equipment, and not to adversely interfere with that other equipment. All such equipment emits electrical...

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ElectroMagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is a characteristic of electrical and electronic equipment that permits it to operate as intended in the presence of other electrical and electronic equipment, and not to adversely interfere with that other equipment.


All such equipment emits electrical energy, and some of that emitted energy may interact and interfere with other equipment. Equally, equipment may be susceptible to receiving energy emitted from other sources. Obviously, radio transmitters and receivers are intended to emit and receive electrical energy, but other equipment may not be intended to do so.


Even transmitters and receivers may emit and receive unwanted energy that may prevent those devices, or others, from functioning as intended. It is part of the EMC 'art' to design and operate equipment so that it is both prevented from emitting spurious energy that can cause interference, and is immune to the adverse effects of any spurious energy that it may receive.


EMC regulation

As the effects of interference have severe consequences, EMC is frequently a subject of national and international regulation. Within Europe, EMC regulation is managed mainly through the European Commission's EMC Directive (2014/30EU) and for Radio equipment through Directive 2014/53/EU. However, there are many types of equipment that are excluded from the EMC Directive, although EMC requirements for most of them are included in other Directives and regulations. Here are some examples:

·Equipment covered by the Radio Equipment Directive (RED)

·Certain aeronautical items

·Automotive components

·Medical devices, including implantable devices

·Marine equipment

·Amateur radio equipment not available commercially.


The EMC Directive and many of the other relevant Directives are 'New Approach' Directives. As such, they rely for their operation on Harmonized Standards developed by recognized European standards bodies, such as ETSI. Harmonized Standards define technical characteristics which can be used to demonstrate compliance with the essential requirements of the Directive.


In the case of the EMC Directive, the essential requirements are that equipment shall be designed and manufactured such that:

·the electromagnetic disturbance it generates does not exceed a level allowing radio and telecommunications equipment and other apparatus to operate as intended; and

·the apparatus has an adequate level of intrinsic immunity to electromagnetic disturbance to enable it to operate as intended.


Equipment which meets Harmonised Standards is presumed to comply with the essential requirements, and a manufacturer may declare conformity with the Directive. Alternatively, manufacturers may choose to request certification of equipment by a recognized third party, known as a 'Notified Body'.


CNAS Accreditation

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FCC accreditation

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